Renu George

Founder & gallerist, Gallery Time and Space

 

Paradoxical sensuality and childlike innocence

Sen Shombit – artist and man of love and courage. Characters on a canvas.  The woman is the symbol of human sensitivity and sensibility and the animal is the presence of instinctual forces within and without. The male form is the primeval force and often a foil to this eternal and alpha form of the nurturing woman.  With the child we have multifaceted emotions with the feminine balancing the maternal and mating.  The love play is the essence of Shombit’s paintings which are imbued with a paradoxical sensuality and childlike innocence.  Spring like and celebratory colours infuse the canvas and draw the viewer into a vortex of sensation that rises to the surface with the forms that have the appearance of a temporal and moving phenomenon.

Sen Shombit is an internationally renowned artist whose journey from Kolkata to Paris as a penniless artist was the proverbial search for artistic exploration and relevance.  A journey that has brought him back to his home country but as a world renowned artist who has showcased his works in some of the most prestigious salons, including the Louvre.  His artwork is in the permanent collection of the Barbizon museum made famous by its founder, the artist Jean-François Millet whose school of art was a part of the Realism movement in France and forerunner of Impressionism.

Patrice de la Perriere...

Jack Lang...

Alberto Moioli...

Corinne Asseraf...

Philippe Douce...

Jean-Paul Larçon...

Patrick Navarre...

Dr. Una Chaudhuri...

Sandip Sarkar...

INDIA’S BLOODY INDEPENDENCE
IN 1947
When India was partitioned 1947 to create Pakistan, a new country for Muslims, about 20 million people of Bengal and Punjab were displaced and brutally victimized. Sen’s wealthy, literate family had huge landed property in erstwhile East Bengal, the present Bangladesh, which was carved out to be East Pakistan for Muslims. So for being Hindus Sen’s family was overnight evicted from their home. Without taking any possessions, they fled for their lives amidst people warring over religion, and so became squatted refugees in West Bengal.