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Breaking free
Cashmere
Cathedral stained glass
Encircled
Flying water
Horse heads water
A typical sachet made by hand at home
Giant sachet on Champs Elysees, announcing Sen's Paris exhibition
Sprouting sachet
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Breaking free
Cashmere
Cathedral stained glass
Encircled
Flying water
Horse heads water
A typical sachet made by hand at home
Giant sachet on Champs Elysees, announcing Sen's Paris exhibition
Sprouting sachet
previous arrow
next arrow

In 1992, when Sen was leading a busy, globetrotting designer’s life in Paris, he got the sad news of his grandmother’s death in Bengal. Nostalgia enveloped him. He remembered that sitting by her side he’d often make small sachets from disposed newspaper to earn some money. Grocery stores would buy these sachets to pack loose rice or sugar inside. Such sachet-making was another home commerce activity in his refugee colony. The melancholy of losing his grandmother gave way to Sen’s creation of the art of the sachet as installation.

In Paris Sen started re-making large sachets in paper, canvas and ceramics. He painted on the sachets to create a new installation art form. Using the same technique of folds that he knew from having done it in his childhood, Sen practiced this new art form by first making the sachets himself on different types of paper & canvas. He has since developed this installation art form in ceramics.

INDIA’S BLOODY INDEPENDENCE
IN 1947
When India was partitioned 1947 to create Pakistan, a new country for Muslims, about 20 million people of Bengal and Punjab were displaced and brutally victimized. Sen’s wealthy, literate family had huge landed property in erstwhile East Bengal, the present Bangladesh, which was carved out to be East Pakistan for Muslims. So for being Hindus Sen’s family was overnight evicted from their home. Without taking any possessions, they fled for their lives amidst people warring over religion, and so became squatted refugees in West Bengal.